How To Reprime Your Whole House Reverse Osmosis System After Cleaning Tank

A reverse osmosis system is a water filtration system that reduces the amount of dissolved and suspended matter in the drinking water. It is great for those who want their drinking water to be clean and pure, but it can also become heavily contaminated due to poor maintenance. These contaminants could include bacteria, parasites, chemicals, heavy metals, and more. If you want to maintain your reverse osmosis system properly, it is important that you clean out the tank every few months depending on how often you use it. This guide will show you how to reprime and re-pressurize your whole house reverse osmosis system after cleaning tank.

How to Reprime Your Whole House Reverse Osmosis System After Cleaning Tank

When you first purchase your new reverse osmosis system, the tank is already primed. This means that all of the water lines that go into the tank will be filtered and cleaned before they reach your home’s drinking water. This makes it easy to clean out the tank when you need to do so.

Here is a step-by-step guide on how to reprime your whole house reverse osmosis system after cleaning tank:

  1. It is important to shut off the power to your reverse osmosis system before beginning this process.
  2. Use a bucket or another receptacle large enough to hold your whole house reverse osmosis system’s filter housing and pump impeller.
  3. Remove the filter housing from the pump impeller by unscrewing it with an Allen wrench according to its size.
  4. Set aside any sediment, if applicable, in a safe place for disposal.
  5. If there are multiple filters in your system, take them out one at a time for washing. For example, if you only have one filter in your reverse osmosis system, then remove it from its housing first and put it in a bucket with clean tap water and detergent for about ten minutes. The cleaner should stir up sediment and other particles that can accumulate on your filter over time, but there will not be any damage done to either unit as long as you use moderate force when removing them from their housings with an Allen wrench.
  6. Rinse each filter individually under running water for about 10 seconds each before putting them back into their housings where they belong. I recommend you use a gentle stream of water and not the full force of your faucet.
  7. Put your house reverse osmosis system’s filter housing back on the pump impeller, screwing it in tightly.
  8. Put your house reverse osmosis system back on its base and drain the water from the line so that it can be completely drained.
  9. Disconnect the power cord from your house reverse osmosis system and let it sit for a couple of minutes to allow all residual water to drain out of each tubing or pipe connected to it.
  10. Connect the power cord back onto your house reverse osmosis system.
  11. Turn the power switch on to start up your house reverse osmosis system.
  12. Let your house reverse osmosis system run for a couple of hours to allow the filters to begin filtering the water.
  13. After running your house reverse osmosis system for a couple of hours, turn off your house reverse osmosis system and let it sit for about an hour before unplugging it from its power source.
  14. Take one of the two housings that houses your two filters, and remove it from its housing by gently pulling it away from the pump impeller with moderate force, making sure not to damage either of them in any way.
  15. Once removed, rinse both housings under running water until they are completely clean.
  16. Remove the filter from the housing and set it aside for later use.
  17. Using a soft brush, remove any loose debris that may have accumulated inside your house reverse osmosis system, such as sediment or particles of dirt.
  18. Rinse both housings under running water until they are completely clean and free from any residue.
  19. Place both housings back into their respective housings.
  20. Reattach one of the two housings to its housing using a couple of screws and nuts that are included with your house reverse osmosis system. Be sure to tighten them down firmly so that they do not come loose again during use.
  21. Attach the other housing to its housing in a similar manner.
  22. Place the new filter back inside its housing and screw the filter into place using the same screws and nuts that you used to attach the housings together.
  23. Reattach the other housing to its housing in a similar manner.
  24. Reattach your two housings to your pump assembly, making sure that they are securely screwed into place.
  25. Reattach your pump assembly to its base plate by tightening down all of the screws and nuts that are included with it.
  26. Attach your water line to your reverse osmosis system by inserting it through one of the holes found on the base plate of your system, making sure not to kink or bend any of it in any way.
  27. Attach your water filter to the other hole found on the base plate of your system.
  28. Turn on your reverse osmosis system and test it out to ensure that it is working properly.
  29. Once you have tested out your reverse osmosis system and have confirmed that it is functioning properly, you can begin using it.
How-To: Repressurizing a Reverse Osmosis (RO) System

How to Repressurize Your Reverse Osmosis System

Check the Flow Switch, Pressure Switch, and Drip Line

After you’ve finished cleaning out the tank, it is important to check the flow switch, pressure switch, and drip line. You should make sure that these parts of the reverse osmosis system are still working properly after cleaning. The flow switch is located on your reverse osmosis system’s lateral pipe, just before the tank. It allows water to enter your house through a tube when it’s turned on.

The pressure switch prevents air from entering the system and causing damage to other parts of the system. The drip line is connected to one of your faucets and releases water into your house only when you turn on the water in that specific faucet. If either of these components aren’t working properly, they will need to be replaced.

Clean Out the Tank and Clean the Cartridges

An important step to your reverse osmosis system is cleaning the cartridge. To clean out the tank, you need to remove the cartridges and clean them with soap and water. Make sure that you are using the right type of soap for cleaning. There are specific cleaners designed for detergents and bleach, or you can use a regular type of soap like dishwasher or laundry soap. After cleaning out the tank and cartridges, it is time to reprime your whole house reverse osmosis system.

To prime your whole house reverse osmosis system, place a few drops of food-grade mineral oil in the inlet valve on top of each pump unit attached to a faucet. It is also important that you add a few drops of food-grade mineral oil into each cap on either side of the water filter housing where the water enters your home’s plumbing system. These few drops will help prevent corrosion and other issues from occurring during long-term use.

Take Care of Your Tank

The tank is what holds your water. It is important that you give it proper care so that the water inside of it stays clean and pure. Every month or two, your reverse osmosis system should be cleaned out so that there’s no buildup in the tank. You can also do this if you want to maintain your reverse osmosis system correctly by taking care of it.

To clean out the tank, it’s recommended to take off the top part of the filter section and then use a small brush to get into all of the nooks and crannies. Then, pour in some vinegar with warm water, let it sit for about five minutes and then rinse out with clear warm water until you can’t see any more debris floating around. Finally, reassemble everything back together so that it’s easier to use when you need to filter more water.

Do You Need to Pressurize a Reverse Osmosis Tank?

As long as the water pressure coming from your faucet is lower than the pressure being put out by your reverse osmosis system, you don’t need to pressurize your tank. However, if you’re using a smaller tank and your water pressure is low, then it’s recommended that you do so.

If you want to add more water in your system, then you can use a larger tank or simply add another filter. If you want to add more water and don’t want to buy a new filter, then you can use a hose that has an adapter on it so that it can be used with the original one.

If you have a home with low water pressure coming from your faucet and are wondering if you should pressurize your reverse osmosis system, then the answer is yes.

How Do You Repressurize My Reverse Osmosis Holding Tank Using Compressed Air?

One way to reprime your whole house reverse osmosis system after cleaning tank is to use an air compressor. This process uses compressed air to push water back into the tank, which helps flush the contaminants out of the system. To do this, you need two things: a compressor and a hose. You will need to fit your hose onto the end of a compression hose that attaches to your compressor. You will also need a valve and a pressure gauge on each line.

To begin, attach one line from the pressure gauge and valve onto the intake side of your pump (the inlet where you put water into the system). Attach another line from the pressure gauge and valve onto the outlet side of your pump (the outlet where you can get water out of your system). Now attach a third line from the pressure gauge and valve onto either one of two hoses that are attached together at one end with a T-fitting. Attach this third line between these two hoses so it comes out at their other ends.

Now connect an air compressor to this third line using its compression hose. Attach the other end of this compression hose to one of these two hoses with an “F” fitting, then add a T-fitting at both ends so that it can be connected to another piece of tubing or a garden hose or something similar.

Turn on your air compressor and make sure it’s set on high pressure before attaching it to any lines or hoses. Open up the air valve on your air compressor (it will be a large, round, metal thing with a handle on it) so that it’s not completely closed. Now attach one end of the garden hose to the “F” fitting at one end of your third piece of tubing and attach the other end to the “F” fitting at one end of your other piece of tubing.

The reason for this is that if you attach both ends to the same “F” fitting and then try to open up your air valve, you will blow out all the water in your system and everything will be ruined. That being said, if you don’t have an air compressor handy and are unable to wait until you get home, there is a way to do this without it. Go to your local hardware store and buy a hose clamp and two hose clamps, then go home. Put the clamp on one end of your garden hose and open up your air valve just a little bit. Put the other end of the garden hose into the clamp on your compressor and tighten it, then turn off your air compressor.

Now you have a garden hose with an “F” fitting at each end of it, which allows you to connect them together so that they are now one continuous piece of tubing with an “F” fitting at each end. You can now attach this to another piece of tubing or a garden hose or something similar so that you have a continuous piece of water tubing in which you can attach your air valve to.

Now you are ready to use your air valve. The only thing left to do is put the air pressure in so that you can fill up your system with air, then close the air valve and open it back up again and check if it works.

Here are some of the top-rated air compressors that work well with reverse osmosis systems:

How Do You Bleed a Reverse Osmosis System?

First, you need to find a small opening in the system—this will be where your water will flow out of the tank. You then need to turn on the cold water supply and watch for a few minutes. If you don’t see any bubbles coming from the hole, it is safe to assume that bleeding the system is done and you can turn off the cold water supply.

How Long Do RO Tanks Last?

The lifespan of a reverse osmosis system can vary depending on factors like the size of the tank and how often it is used. Bigger tanks tend to last longer than smaller ones, and more people using a system tends to make it last longer as well. Tanks also have an expected lifespan based on the type of system that it is. Systems with carbon filters will typically last for up to 10 years, while salt-based systems can last up to 15 years.

How Often Should RO Tanks Be Cleaned?

A reverse osmosis tank should be cleaned at least once every three months if you use it regularly. If you are not using your reverse osmosis system regularly, then you should clean it out once every six months or so. If you have hard water in your home, then you should clean your tank out more often than someone with soft water because harder water leaves behind more sediment in the tank that needs to be removed from time to time.

Conclusion

A reverse osmosis system is a device that removes and filters water and other liquids as they pass through the system. These systems are typically used for clean water sources, such as drinking water and water used in cleaning.

Your whole house reverse osmosis system needs to be primed like your tank, so you can get a clean, healthy drink of water.

To reprime your whole house reverse osmosis system, follow this easy step-by-step guide we have discussed in this article.

Meet the author: Robert Johnson

Robert Johnson is a professional kiteboarder, surfer, and lifeguard. He’s been involved in many different sports and has competed at the national level in multiple disciplines. Robert has been an avid comic book reader since he was a child and is now also a video game enthusiast. “I’m a geek and a nerd who loves to read, fish, and play video games. I occasionally write.” Learn more about Robert and the rest of the team.